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Friday, January 3, 2020

what is Biology?

What is Biology?
Biology is often called the science of life in studies that include everything from an organism’sconception to its death. It is mainly concerned with the study of living systems—from animal to plant and everything in between—and includes the study of various organisms’ cells, metabolism, reproduction, growth, activity of systems, and response to the stimuli in their environment.

 French biologist name Jean-Baptiste Pierre Antoine de Monet de Lamarck in the year (1744–1829) is credited with coined the term “biology” from the Greek word bios, which meaning is  “life and logy, meaning is “study of” in 1802  That  describe the science of life. He was  the first to publish a version of an evolutionary tree that describes the ancestral relationships among all species an early classification system, first to distinguish between vertebrates and invertebrates and is often considered one of the first evolutionists.

Some of branch of Biology:

Numerous studies are within the field of biology. The following lists some of the most familiar biologically oriented scientific divisions and their relevant studies:

Anatomist—Studies the structures of living organisms (other divisions exist within

this field, such as a comparative anatomist who studies the similarities and differences in animal body structures).

Astrobiologist—Studies the possibility of life or the formation and/or possible distribution of life on early Earth and throughout the solar system and universe.

Bacteriologist—Studies the intricacies of bacteria (and within this field, numerous other divisions exist based on the type of bacteria studied).



Biochemist—Studies the compounds and chemical reactions that take place in living organisms.

Biophysicist—Studies living things using the techniques and tools used in the field

of physics other divisions exist based on the type of bacteria studied).

Biochemist—Studies the compounds and chemical reactions that take place in living organisms.

Biophysicist—Studies living things using the techniques and tools used in the field

of physics.

Botanist—Studies the world of plants.

Cryobiologist—Studies how extreme cold affects living organisms.

Ecologist—Studies how living organisms respond to their environment.

Embryologist—Studies the formation and development of organisms from conception to adulthood.

Entomologist—Studies the structure, function, and behavior of insects.

Ethologist—Studies certain animal behavior under natural conditions.

Exobiologist—Studies the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe and how that life could come about.

Geneticist—Studies the field of heredity and genetics.

Gnotobioticist—Studies how organisms grow in a germ-free environment or studies organisms that grow in environments with certain specific germs.

Histologist—Studies the tissues of living organisms.

Ichthyologist—Studies fish (usually specific types, such as freshwater or ocean fish).

Lepidopterist—Studies organisms that live in freshwater areas.

Marine biologist—Studies life in the ocean (usually specific organisms, such as squid or sharks).

Molecular biologist—Studies the molecular processes that occur in the cells of organisms.

Mycologist—Studies the intricacies of fungi.

Oologist—Studies bird eggs, including the development of eggs from certain types of birds.

Organic chemist—Studies the compounds from living organisms.

Ornithologist—Studies the structure, function, and behavior of birds.

Paleontologist—Studies prehistoric life (although this is actually a field of geology, many paleontologists have an extensive background in biological studies).

Parasitologist—Studies the life cycle of parasites.

Taxonomist—Studies the classification of organisms.

Virologist—Studies the development of viruses and how they affect other organisms.

Zoologist—Studies the structure, function, development, and/or behavior of animals

(usually in specific regions, such as desert or tundra animals, or specific animals,

such as polar bears or grizzly bears).

References

1. The Based on definition from: "Aquarena Wetlands Project glossary of terms". Texas State University at San Marcos. Archived from the original on 2004-06-08.

2.Davies, PC; Rieper, E; Tuszynski, JA (January 2013). "Self-organization and entropy reduction in a living cell". Bio Systems. 111 (1): 1–10. doi:10.1016/j.biosystems.2012.10.005. PMC 3712629. PMID 23159919.

3. The Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann (December 2015). "A physiologist's view of homeostasis". Advances in Physiology Education. 39(4):259–66.doi:10.1152/advan.00107.2015.ISSN10434046. PMC 4669363. PMID 26628

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